Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn

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With the low-altitude display over the German Autobahn

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-display

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Brave new information world: the head-up display puts all relevant information in the driver’s field of vision.

Source: BMW / SystemĽBrandsĽBMWĽAutomobilesĽ6

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-german They range from the current speed to speed limit and navigation instructions to the selection of songs. ">

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The information that is projected onto the windshield can be set individually. They range from the current speed to speed limit and navigation instructions to hin to the song selection.

Source: BMW

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-low-altitude

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But you can also get a display of the best time to overtake a vehicle in order to prevent a possible rear-end collision.

Source: BMW / SystemĽTechnology, Research & De

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-windshield

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The driver no longer has to take his eyes off the road to read information from the navigation screen in the center console, for example.

Source: BMW

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-autobahn

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The eye does not have to constantly switch from close to far. This is particularly convenient for older drivers.

Source: BMW / SystemĽTechnology, Research & De

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-future

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With the “Night Vision” assistance system from BMW, people are recognized even at night. If the system detects a possible danger to people, the driver is over the head-up-Display warned.

Source: BMW / SystemĽTechnology, Research & De

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-future

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While head-up displays are still a novelty for drivers, combat pilots can no longer imagine a flight without them. The first head-up displays already existed in the 40ss.

Source: Manufacturer

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-low-altitude

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A head-up display in the Eurofighter gives the pilot information on the flight situation, destination and navigation.

Source: Manufacturer

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-autobahn

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All flight-related data as well as important information for an operation appear on a second vertical pane in the cockpit via a front window projectorions and signals.

Source: Manufacturer / Ingo Bicker

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-autobahn

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In order to avoid any distraction for the pilot, all information appears virtually on the horizon at eye level.

Source: Manufacturer

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-windshield

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However, the development of head-up displays continues unstoppably. Audi is currently working on a system that can display three head-up displays in one cockpit: Neben the display for the driver there is also one for the front passenger and a central, apparently on the window pane, the size of an ipad central display.

Source: Audi

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-future

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Video telephony a la Skype should be possible. If the front passenger wants to see the corresponding video, he pulls the function over to his right screen with a swiping gesture. The driver can listen in, but has to do without moving images.

Source: Audi

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-future

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Mercedes does not yet have a head-up display on offer. But it is also an issue for the developers in Stuttgart. You are working on a system called "Augmented Reality" (extended Reality). With technology, the reality outside the car is enriched with digital information. For example, you can learn interesting things about sights. If you drive past a special bridge, the system provides useful details about the structure.

Source: Daimler

Windshield of the future: With the low-altitude display over the German autobahn-autobahn

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A Facebook friend, who asks about the evening plans, could also move into the field of vision. However, experts do not believe that such a system really is ones day is offered to the motorist. The distraction would be just too big.

Source: Daimler

It has been standard in aircraft for decades. Now the head-up display comes into the car. The colored graphics projected onto the windshield are set to revolutionize driving.

E.in Eurofighter pilots would never want to go without blowing up. Because hunting low over hilly terrain at a speed of 800 mph requires maximum concentration. "If you cover a good 220 meters per second at treetop level, only an extremely precise head-up display (HUD) provides the necessary inner peace," says Lieutenant Colonel Robert Hierl, test pilot at the Defense Technical Department for Aircraft in Manching near Ingolstadt.

In aviation, the forerunners of today’s head-up systems first appeared in the warlike 1940s; in Germany they were known as reflex sights and were intended as a target device. It took until 1977 before the first military HUD with pictorial representations was ready for series production.

Today even civil Airbus and Boeing pilots no longer want to do without the benefits of the additional display. This means you can concentrate fully on turbulence, crosswinds and the approaching runway during gusty landing approaches.

The head-up screen

While the information in aircraft cockpits is reflected on a separate pane of glass, in the car it usually ends up directly on the windshield. In both cases, the advantage is obvious: every time you look, for example at the speedometer, your eyes leave the road for a good second – in this period you cover almost 28 meters at a speed of 100 km / h.

A HUD cuts the amount of time the visual distraction takes in half. The head does not have to wander to take in information, the eyes can stay straight ahead. This attitude also explains the name: Head-up display means head-up screen.

First, General Motors used a HUD in the staid Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme in 1988 and ten years later in the Corvette C5. Compared to the displays commonly used today, the early vacuum fluorescent displays only had a maximum of a third of the luminosity.

A clear brightening and much more was achieved by BMW together with Siemens VDO in 2004. The system offered for the 5-series shone with a new type of TFT display, LED for backlighting and a special mirror system. Less than two meters in front of the driver’s eyes, the image seemed to float above the radiator grille and, with clear symbols or the display of street names, was particularly helpful for navigation.

Relief especially for older drivers

"Because the eye does not have to constantly switch between near and far vision, older drivers in particular found this a great relief," says Gunnar Franz, who heads HUD development at BMW. Buyers were enthusiastic, but the competition only followed suit very occasionally: Cadillac donated such a high-tech delicacy to the Roadster XLR in 2004, and Citroën in 2005 to the upper-class C6.

In 2006 BMW brought the next evolutionary stage together with the new system partner Nippon Seiki. For the first time in the second X5 series, the Bavarians now also boasted a height-adjustable display. It was not until 2011 before a full-color display followed for the first time in the new 6 Series – here rival Audi was ahead with the A7 presented in 2010.

Franz nevertheless emphasizes the progress made in the meantime: “With the system for the new 3 Series, for example, we have halved the weight compared to the X5; While two white LEDs are sufficient today, 128 small colored lamps used to be required for the lighting. At the same time, the resolution improved dramatically: from 320 x 160 to 480 x 240 pixels. "

The surcharge for a current information cinema from BMW for the large 7-series, 6-series and 5-series is 1390 euros; for the system of the 3 series, supplied by Continental, 980 euros are due. These are no longer exorbitant prices, especially since today’s head-up displays convey more information than ever. Franz reports "high double-digit order rates for some derivatives".

Peugeot offers an inexpensive alternative

He sees a safety gain in the fact that the maximum permissible speed is now displayed next to the information for the current speed. "As a result, the drivers are more inclined to adhere to the speed limit."

In 2009, Peugeot surprised everyone with a head-up variant for the Van 3008 developed by the supplier Johnson Controls. Information was projected onto a transparent polycarbonate sign that extended when the ignition was switched on. This pseudo-HUD is not in the windshield, but is high and far enough away that you don’t have to look down at the instruments.

The inclination and brightness of the discs can be varied, the surcharges moderate: 390 euros for the Peugeot 3008 and 5008 and 450 euros for the first-ever colored version in the 508/508 SW. Citroën is now also using the system in the DS5. The solution is cheaper because there is no expensive special treatment of the curved windshield.

Audi switched to the head-up course a little later than BMW, but then with emphasis. Ingolstadt is particularly proud of the "30 percent more compact design compared to the competition".

The system, which is now also available for the A6, costs 1,380 euros and offers everything that is state-of-the-art today. But the thoughts of the head-up experts have long been revolving around the next evolutionary stage. The magic word is “contact-analogue advertisements”. They are given more life of their own and are faded in as if they were an integral part of the real environment.

Include the passenger as well

If the driver approaches an intersection, the HUD places a transparent route guidance arrow exactly there. At first it is still small, but at a distance of ten meters it looks as big as a real arrow on the road. "Thanks to the spatial reference created in the display, the information is processed much more intuitively and therefore faster, more convenient and safer," says HUD expert Gunnar Franz.

Such displays are still four times the size of today’s modules. It would therefore take another three to five years for the series to be launched. Especially since today’s navigation systems cannot yet determine the position of a car precisely enough.

At this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, both Audi and the previously reluctant developers at Mercedes dared to look into the future. The Ingolstadt-based company presented an interior model with three head-up displays.

Ewald Gossmann, Head of Development Operation / Displays at Audi: “In the future, we also want to include the front passenger, but not like in the plane, where everyone stares into their terminal. That is why we are showing a display in the middle on which the driver and front passenger can view and discuss content together. The content is moved between the displays using gesture control. "

The whole pane becomes a display

With the interior sculpture DICE (Dynamic & Intuitive Control Experience), Mercedes dared to take the step into so-called Augmented Reality. The whole disc becomes a display here. Free parking spaces are highlighted virtually or data on an attraction – such as large bridges – are displayed. Or a young lady appears in the glass, filling the format, and asks: "Is there a party going on somewhere tonight?"?

The question remains whether car occupants really always want to know what is going on outside. Ralf Lamberti, Head of Infotainment, Telematics and Interior at Daimler Research, believes in it. “I move my car through a world full of information. More and more people want to access it. "

However, Ralf Lamberti also wants to prevent the driver from being distracted too much. “That will certainly not happen in a moving car. But we can very well imagine bringing elements of augmented reality into an enlarged head-up display. ”It doesn’t have to be the whole windshield.

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