Successful test for more charging points in the countryside

Successful test for more charging points in the countryside-test

E-mobility is gaining momentum. According to the coalition agreement of the new government, 15 million e-cars should be on German roads by 2030 and one million publicly accessible charging points should be available. According to the operator Netze BW, which belongs to the energy group EnBW, around 70 percent of the charging processes will take place at private stations. “The number of reports for private charging stations is increasing exponentially,” says Markus Wunsch, Head of Network Integration Electromobility at Netze BW. In order to do justice to this ramp-up, one must understand the associated effects on the power grid.

For some time now, Netze BW has been investigating the effects of charging e-cars on the power grid in practical field tests. In the “E-Mobility-Allee” NETZlabor, the focus was initially on the urban environment with its dense power grid, followed by the underground car park of an apartment building with numerous charging stations as part of the “E-Mobility-Carre” NETZlabor. According to Netze BW, it has now completed its third field test: In the NETZ laboratory “E-Mobility-Chaussee” in Kusterdingen near Tubingen, it spent 18 months investigating what effects e-mobility has on the power grid, especially in rural areas, and how intelligent control can relieve the grid without having to restrict the charging behavior.

Around 60 percent of the power grids in Baden-Wurttemberg supply rural areas. Electromobility poses a particular challenge for the power grid in these areas. Because the longer a power cable is, the more the voltage level fluctuates. With its typical rural low-voltage network with an 850-meter-long circuit, the Roman road in Kusterdingen was the perfect place for Netze BW’s field test.

In January 2020, seven test customers exchanged their combustion cars for an e-vehicle from Netze BW for 18 months: a Renault Zoe with a high charging capacity of 22 kW or a Nissan Leaf with a lower single-phase capacity of 4.6 kW. Another electric vehicle was already on the road and could be included in the field test. In the street there are 60 residential units with 42 house connections, 13 thermal power systems and three PV systems – as part of the field test, eight wall boxes were added, which can be charged with up to 22 kW.

In total, the participants laid 130 over the entire project period.000 electric kilometers back. That equates to around 12.000 to 15.000 kilometers driven per year and vehicle. From a technical point of view, according to Netze BW, the team examined three possible solutions: the use of preventive charging management, battery storage and a so-called string regulator, which can selectively increase the voltage in the power grid.

According to the results of the study, intelligent charging management offers the greatest flexibility. It directly reduces the load, which is especially important in times of high power consumption. Only half of the participants noticed anything at all. Nobody felt restricted when it came to charging convenience and mobility.

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6 thoughts on “Successful test for more charging points in the countryside”

  1. Nanu, such boring reports? Isn’t there any press release from the successful company Sonomotors?? Perhaps the Nikolaus community advisory board designed a donkey hat with solar cells that customers should wear? And which are available in the shop for €999?

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  2. So Golem’s contribution to the test was more detailed and was not labeled “all good” across the board.
    There were certainly problems with the test and there is still a lot to be done for the network operators in the country if we want to reach the 15 million BEVs by 2030.

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  3. I want to draw some conclusions from the report for the future.

    According to the coalition agreement of the new government, 15 million e-cars should be on German roads by 2030 and one million publicly accessible charging points should be available. Around 70 percent of the charging processes will take place at private stations ..

    ..

    In total, the participants laid 130 over the entire project period.000 electric kilometers back. That equates to around 12.000 to 15.000 kilometers driven per year and vehicle.

    In 2030 – 15 million e-cars, 70% of which charge privately, i.e. 10.5 million. electric cars.

    4.5 million remain. Cars for public charging points.

    4.500.000 electric cars x 13.500 km a year is 60.750.000.000 km.
    60.750.000.000 km at 20 kWh per 100 km are 12.150.000.000 kWh.
    12.150.000.000 kWh divided by 1 million. public charging points are 12.150 kWh per charging point.

    12.150 kWh per charging point per year is 33.29 kWh per day on average, i.H. around 1 e-car charges per day on average at one of the 1 million. Charging points – there should hardly be any traffic jams at the charging point.

    33.29 kWh per day and charging point on average x 0.30 euros per kWh would be around 9.99 euros.

    Almost 10 euros a day would be about 3.650 euros a year less electricity purchases, depreciation and costs, so most charging points should be a big loss, but help e-car drivers.

    If it helps electromobility and climate protection, then I would like to subsidize these unprofitable charging points with my tax, because the consequences of a climate catastrophe would also affect me.

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  4. “The use of preventive charging management, battery storage and a so-called string regulator, which can selectively increase the voltage in the power grid.”

    With 8 wall boxes, and what do you do with 80 wall boxes, that’s not too much for 60 residential units, and in the future you would also like to heat the 60 residential units electrically.

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  5. The conceptual error lies in the average values ​​of km performance and thus loading. If really approx. 13.5 million.have an e-car, then inevitably longer distances are covered with the e-car and the fast charger is besieged, this becomes the critical element also because of the high costs of the energy supply lines etc. Currently e.g.B. Ionity charging stations can already be observed on the A3 between Erlangen and Frankfurt and are well frequented. I don’t see these problems as critical for rural private loaders, but rather for urban blocks of flats.

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  6. I think statistics bring us no further here. I would rather agree that charging station planning should be based on peak loads – summer and holidays / leisure time. Please also set up fast chargers on the busy highways. Or should I charge or charge for 5 hours with 3.4 kW / 7.2 kW on an AC column while passing through, far from the motorway?. drive to the next town, straight through to an existing quick-charging station, and then straight through again, back to the trunk road, additional driving time min. 30 minutes.
    Otherwise you could also close the gas stations here in rural areas – sometimes nobody fills up at 8 pumps for hours.

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