How the transport sector can become more sustainable

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How the transport sector can become more sustainable-sector

The transport sector is the great problem child of German climate goals: In contrast to the other sectors since 1990, no significant savings could be achieved since 1990. So as a reform of taxes and charges could finally direct the transport sector into a sustainable future? Higher CO2 prizes in combination with the abolition of the EEG surcharge, adequate taxation of company cars, a bonus malus system for car purchase and an additional CO2 component in the truck toll could contribute short to medium term. These are central results of a study by the Eco Institute, the Forum Ecological-Social Market Economy and Prof. Dr. Stefan Klinski on behalf of the Federal Environmental Agency, which can be found here as a detailed PDF.

“The taxation of our mobility comes from the fossil age with petroleum, gasoline & co.”Fits Dr. Wiebke room, Deputy Head of Resource & Mobility at the Eco Institute. “It no longer fits the requirements for sustainable, fair, individual mobility and therefore needs to be re-aligned.”A sustainable transport policy must also be aligned in the requirements of climate protection as well as on criteria of social compatibility and other environmental protection goals such as avoiding noise and pollutants or a smaller area consumption. In addition, they must also provide funds to finance the sustainable mobility of the future, the Eco-Institut in a recent communication.

The reform package at a glance

For this, about 2030, the CO2 prize in traffic should reflect the true social costs of climate protection of more than 200 euros per tonne CO2. If so prices for fossil car kilometers rise, alternatives such as public transport as well as foot and cycling can be supported and expanded. Social compatible for people with lower income will be this measure when the EEG surcharge is abolished at the same time and so the electricity price decreases.

In addition, the car traffic must be switched quickly to electromobility. This requires stronger incentives in vehicle purchase – such as a bonus-malus system. By additional revenue of CO2-intensive vehicles (Malus), a purchase bonus for electric cars (bonus) can be counterparted. Thus, not all taxpayers do not finance the purchase of E-cars, but only those who make a “dirty” new car – a climate protection contribution, which is also socially friendly, is the eco-institute.

As another component, the private use of company cars should be taxed higher, so that company cars are not used privately or not even. Because the taxable amount is independent of the use and because companies often pay for the operating costs, the incentive is very large today today. In addition, there are usually people with a higher income already higher – the company car package is therefore socially unfair and ecologically counterproductive, as a study has shown only recently.

Last but not least, the question of financing the transport sector of the future plays a crucial role. The energy tax, which currently accounts for the largest share of tax revenues from the transport sector, is strongly declining to 2050 and thus loses its central financing role. The revenue of electricity tax and the CO2 pricing can not completely compensate for this decline. Therefore, the street infrastructure in the future would have to be counterparted directly by its users. A toll for all vehicles trucks and cars, depending on the kilometers driven – seems to be the best solution from today’s perspective.

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5 thoughts on “How the transport sector can become more sustainable”

  1. “Social compatible for people with lower income will be this measure when the EEG surcharge is abolished at the same time and so the electricity price decreases.”Yes, because of the electricity prices are currently so massively rise to the not to be remarked by the reduction / abolition of the EEG surcharge. Since the government has to be massively re-driven so that the recipients of Liegen income get a real relief and not only on the paper

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  2. That nonsense I already commented on another portal yesterday. Here the commuter flat rate has been forgotten, this is a control means in the wrong direction. Shelling is rewarded, while non-commuting should be rewarded. Likewise, you have to pound the burner through driving bans and let the electric car expensive. Service car for private rides expensive to tax is only causing a second car to be purchased. Nobody can do that.

    It is completely wrong that gray and pompom accept as a securitized right to own a passenger car and thus be allowed to go everywhere. It’s time for a salted toll for all vehicles. Even as a Porschelfeer, I say that these mentally old, old people who believe with their burner-911 to have the right to trust all the environment, on hard driving bans at all places, where it is beautiful, come: Z.B. Sylt, Alps, Black Forest, Spa, City Cities. The same applies to burner motorcycles, which have no meaning anyway anyway.

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  3. I recommend reading “car traffic” in the viewed coalition agreement from line 1647 and then perform a reality check.

    In accordance with the proposals of the European Commission, only CO2 neutral vehicles are approved in the transport sector in Europe 2035 – accordingly, this is in Germany. Outside the existing system of fleet limits, we are committed to providing evidence only with e-fuel vehicles remembered. We set ourselves for the adoption of an ambitious and implementable pollutant standard Euro 7 and will take into account added value and jobs.

    The burner will be preserved for a long time.

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  4. Last but not least, the question of financing the transport sector of the future plays a crucial role. The energy tax, which currently accounts for the largest share of tax revenues from the transport sector, is strongly declining to 2050 and thus loses its central financing role. The revenue of electricity tax and the CO2 pricing can not completely compensate for this decline. Therefore, the street infrastructure in the future would have to be counterparted directly by its users. A toll for all vehicles trucks and cars, depending on the kilometers driven – seems to be the best solution from today’s perspective.

    The load on the roads depends heavily on weight, so the weight must also be considered so that there is a reasonably fair distribution.

    Vehicles to Z.B. 1.000 kg (Zul. Total weight 1.400 kg) could be excluded as they do not just burden the streets, but also consume less resources in making.

    On the other hand, heavy trucks would have to be heavily loaded with a levy, as they also produce massive road damage even massive particulate matter by mature abrasion.

    An important point is the construction of separate bicycle paths, tobuild-financed, so that a large part of the short-distance transport (persons and delivery services) can be mastered well by (electro-) bicycle.

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  5. “As another component, the private use of company cars should be taxed higher so that company cars are not used privately or not even.”

    So that company car driver still have to add a private car? And if the company car is a BEV? You may be able to take a few thoughts over again. In my view, this approach is not responsible.

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